Oct
12
2020

Pip and Myles talk to David about the NGV Triennial 2020

Uncategorized

Exploring some of the most globally relevant and pressing issues of our time, including isolation,
representation and speculation on the future, the NGV Triennial will present a large-scale exhibition of
international contemporary art, design and architecture. Featuring 86 projects by more than 100 artists,
designers and collectives from more than 30 countries, the NGV Triennial will open at NGV International on
19 December 2020. Comprising an ambitious and diverse selection of works showcasing the vanguard of
contemporary practice, the exhibition offers a visually arresting and thought-provoking view of the world at
this unique moment.
Featuring works by Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopia) Alicja Kwade (Germany), Cerith Wyn Evans (Wales),
Dhambit Mununggurr (Australia), Faye Toogood (England), Fred Wilson (USA), Hannah Brontë
(Australia), Jeff Koons (USA), JR (France), Kengo Kuma (Japan), Liam Young (Australia), Misaki Kawai
(Japan), Patricia Urquiola (Spain), Porky Hefer (South Africa) and Refik Anadol (Turkey), the NGV
Triennial includes more than 30 major new world-premiere works especially commissioned by the NGV for
this exhibition.
Highlights include: an entire floor dedicated to works concerning light and illumination presented in dialogue
with the NGV’s historical collection; a monumental video work by Refik Anadol spanning 10 metres high
and wide, which uses artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and quantum computing to visualise our
digitised memories of nature; and a larger-than-life mirror-finished sculpture of Venus, Roman goddess of
love, by American artist Jeff Koons.
Further highlights include a comprehensive display of works by Yolngu woman Dhambit Mununggurr, the
first Yolngu artist to depict country in her signature shades of acrylic blue paint. Comprising 15 large-scale
bark paintings and nine larrakitj (hollow poles), some of which stand more than three metres high, the
works have all been painted with the artist’s non-preferred left hand after an accident left her with limited
mobility.