/ Sunday Arts Magazine / Arts / Films, Cabaret musical, Kinky Boots, Richard Morrison, Public Art

 

David and Brendan are looking forward to seeing a Bowie tribute tomorrow (17 Oct) which is part of the Melbourne Festival–featuring the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and five Aussie singers. They then preview their interviews today covering– Public Art at the market, Cabaret-the musical with Paul Capsis , new musical Kinky Boots and artist Richard Morrison’s Obsessions. Brendan then launches into 2 film reviews starting with an adaptation of a third Dan Brown novel called Inferno starring a trim-looking Tom Hanks.  Great scenery, an interesting history lesson and pure escapist entertainment– 3 stars. Next is the unusual doco Tickled which is about competitive endurance tickling! Despite the subject matter, it turns into a dark thriller when a Kiwi reporter goes to the US and looks into this weird world–4.5 stars!

Our very special guests today are:

13:15 to 23:42 mins–David Hawkins is producer of Cabaret the musical which starts on 27 April 2017 at the Athenaeum Theatre.  Bookings open on 21 November 2016. David bought the show in 2013 and it is now all coming together.  He has got Paul Capsis on board and will be announcing the rest of the cast in a few weeks.  David has a background in cabaret himself–having done cabaret acts and then running several cabaret venues in Sydney.  Then he started touring internationals such as Rufus Wainwright and Liza Minnelli and later musicals such as Hedwig and the Angry Inch. The production will be on first in Sydney at the Hayes Theatre from 9 January 2017 with bookings available now. It will be here in April. It’s a timely piece, especially with the political climate today. Paul Capsis wanted it to be a bit edgy which will be different from the more commercial Broadway version. They’ll use Brechtian techniques in it which actually have been written into the script.

27:08 to 47:10 mins–Michael Cassell is producer of Kinky Boots which is having previews at present, with opening night on 22 October at Her Majesty’s Theatre. Michael wanted to be a producer as a teenager and managed to get work experience with Harry M Miller and then worked for him.  Later he worked for Disney. Michael and his team have been working on Kinky Boots for 3 years and are now enjoying the fruits of their labour. He and our hosts talk about the original film with Joel Edgerton, how the musical was created, and Cyndi Lauper and Harvey Fierstein. Cyndi’s music is different from standard musical theatre fare; sounding more like pop.  Our hosts play a couple of songs. Also, you can buy genuine ‘kinky boots’ from an upmarket store which has several outlets. Overall the show is about acceptance and friendship, where we follow the journey of the 2 leading men–one of whom is a drag queen. Michael also talks about the casting process, Lola’s Angels, ticket sales, Cyndi being in town and often at Her Majesty’s AND, not to wear burgundy to the show.

48:33 to 1:02:57 mins–Artist Richard Morrison has been on Joy before and is here to talk about his new exhibition Obsessions on from 20 to 30 October at the Moroccan Deli-cacy in 313 Lygon St Brunswick. It can be seen by appointment only–done by ringing the restaurant and getting Richard’s mobile number. Richard talks about his artistic background including selling art from 12 yo, art school, his main theme then, his use of colour to show depth and space, his nudes, controversy and the pushing the boundaries. Richard is also an art consultant at Jackman Gallery in St Kilda. It gives him a different perspective on art which is a valuable thing. Obsessions originated from Richard thinking about people having habitual desire.  He gravitated away from sex to food, hence the venue Moroccan Deli-cacy where beautiful Moroccan Cuisine is served during the show. He interweaves the paintings with the food and tells the story of each painting. People will be connecting with Richard and engagement with the paintings will be intimate.

1:03:18 to 1:24:32 mins–Chief Curator Natalie King, and artist Timothy Moore are here to talk about Public Art at Queen Victoria Market (QVM) open to the public from 17 -23 October.  This is part of the Biennial Lab and Melbourne Festival. Natalie has been a curator and arts writer for about 20 years, working a lot in Asia, and at present she is working on the Melbourne Biennial Lab and the next Venice Biennale with Aboriginal artist Tracey Moffatt. Tim is a trained architect and director of a firm called SIBLING and has loved the experience of working with artists in the Biennial Lab. Natalie outlines the origins of the Biennial Lab and then talks about her role as chief curator and also Lab co-conveners Claire Doherty and David Cross. Natalie chose QVM as the site because it’s ‘so steeped in multiple histories’ and the constant rhythm and cycle would be compelling for artists. 8 commissions will be presented from 17 October and a collective called Field Theory will broadcast live on 99.7 FM over the whole 7 days. Tim and SIBLING’s involvement is to do with the John Batman obelisk at the corner of QVM.  Natalie talks about the meaning of the title for the Lab ‘What Happens Now?’, the perks of being part of the Melbourne Festival and  outlines some of the commissions.

 

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